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ING ARCHITECTURE 

THE WORK OF 



LOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM 



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1900. Yahora Boat Houje. Madison, Wis. 




YEARS OF LIVING ARCHITECTURE 



THIS WORK DEDICATED 

To my Mother, Anna Lloyd Wright 
Friedrich Froebel, 1876 
Dankmar Adier and Louis H. Sullivan, 1893 
My Wife, Olgivanna 

This exhibition of native architecture was first officially requested 
by Italy and consequently splendidly shown at the Strozzi Palace, 
Florence, June 1951. The generosity of Arthur Kaufmann enabled 
Oskar Stonorov to volunteer to get the material together and arrange 
a preview in Philadelphia in January, 1951. It was there displayed 
much as it was later seen, as a guest at first in Italy, then Switzerland, 
France, Germany, Holland and Mexico: exhibitions also supervised 
by Oskar Stonorov. Each of the events was received in the various 
countries by official dignitaries and accorded high academic honors 
by citations and gold medals. There were illustrious celebrations, 
receptions, banquets-in-honor. Especial numbers of five architectural 
magazines were published in these various nations. Wherever the 
exhibition went there were national sponsors, patrons and important 
social occasions. 

But here at home the case is different. This exhibition itself is not a 
guest but is host. There have been generous offers of sponsorship 
but as its own patron and sponsor now this work should beckon and 
welcome you. Art in a Democracy ought to be its own patron; no 




1912. City by The Sea. Midway Gardens. Chicog 



sponsor should be necessary if our Declaration of Independence 
means what it says. 

As the citizen rises to eminence from humble circumstances by 
his own merit, so the artist must arise in his own good time. 
Therefore here in your own country you are to see a life's work, 
in its own way, for what it may be worth to you. If there are patrons 
they are you. If there are sponsors they are friends in the circum- 
stances who have helped make this exhibition possible. If we as a 
free people are ever to arrive at a culture of our own we should 
not get one nor try to maintain it by illustrious sponsors or powerful 
patrons but by friends genuinely interested in developing and preserv- 
ing the innate virtues of that work. 

If our form of society is true to its own nature conscientious inde- 
pendence should prove a proper test of values. By that test alone 
should any work in the arts survive. Fine-art lives and must eventually 
stand upon its own. The highest humility. Why not now? 
So my friends known or unknown, "Sixty Years of Living Architecture" 

welcomes you. 

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT 





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1893. The Winslow house — 
my first house on my own. It 
became an attraction, far 
and near— a statement start- 
ling and new. The sense of 
shelter emphasized — the 
frieze beneath the overhang- 
ing eaves— the walls perfor- 
ated by a single opening giv- 
ing decorative value to the 
surfaces in which they oc- 
curred, etc. The house was 
sold forty years after it was 
built, for more than three 
times its cost. 

1897. This Luxfer Prism Fa- 
cade in glass and concrete 
was designed for a Chicago 
office building. It has since 
appeared in many guises in 
many countries. A type of 
facade now fashionable. 





1906-07. Unity Temple, Oak Park, lllinoij. So ic, a^ 1 know the first con- 
crete monolith to come from the forms as architecture completely finished. 
The work was cast in wooden forms or boxes — and the forms bear the 
impress of that technique. The plan first began the destruction of the box, 
and the emphasis of interior space as the reality of the building subsequently 
carried on. The entrance is between the Temple and the secular rooms. Here 
electric lighting took visible form in wiring and became a decorative feoture 
of the structure. 



1905-06. The Larkin Building, Buffalo, New York. A fireproof, air-condi- 
tioned building furnished throughout with steel. First in many woys-oll-glas* 
doors, double glass windows, complete air-conditioning, especiolly de- 
5igr.ed steel filing systems, steel desk furniture and seats, telephones and 
ighting system especially designed in steel, etc. Building destroyed in 1950. 






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1909. The Robie house, a masonry 
structure of tawny brick and stone 
with red tile roof, eaves of copper, 
woodwork of oak throughout. This 
became known in Germany as 
Dampfer architecture. It was a 
good example of the prairie-house 
of thaf period. 

1908-09. The Coonley house, Riv- 
erside, Illinois. The articulated plan 
— main functions separated by con- 
necting links each individualized. 
Mrs. Cqonley came to me to build 

se because she said my 
ore the countenance of 
—a great encouragement 

that time. 



1913 The Midway Gardens, Chicago. An early attempt to correlate architecture, sculpture, painting and music in a great garden similar 
to the beer gardens of Germany. The structure was so solidly built that subsequently, when Prohibition came, it cost so much to tear down 
that several contractors were bankrupted by the attempt. The entire place was reinforced concrete and tan colored brick. The murals and 
the sculpture were all integral with the architecture, the orchestra shell a great success acoustically, astonishing everyone except the architect. 




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1913-1919. The Imperial Hotel, built for the Royal household of Japan, was a tribute to Japan as she was rising from her knees to her feet. She 
had been eating from the floor, sleeping on the floor, and now had to learn to sit at tables and climb into bed to sleep. The building was 
intended to harmonize with those around the moat across the park before it. The Royal household was shocked when I decided to use oya, 
the slone-ordinaire under foot in Tokyo for the structure, with a brick handmade in Japan for the first time. The architect persevered, 
finally got what he wanted, and great blocks of oya began floating down by sea and canal from the quarries of Nikko to the site. But a 
permit to build the building was awaited in vain. Finally a meeting with the authorities was held at which they took the view that a world 




famous architect would not come to 
Japan to build something that would fall 
down under any circumstances. They 
could not understand the propositions we 
made but were willing to watch and wait 
and probably learn something worth 
learning. Accordingly we proceeded— to 
build the building with all the help they 
could give. 

I have sometimes been asked why I did 
not make the opus more "modern." The 
answer is that there was a tradition there 
worthy of respect and I felt it my duty 
as well OS my privilege to make the build- 
ing belong to them so far as I might. 
The principle of flexibility instead of rig- 
idity here vindicated itself with inspiring 
results. But the A. I. A. commission sent to 
study conditions in Japan subsequent to 
the great temblor of 1922 made no men- 
tion of the structure. 





1912-13. The Barnsdall 
house, Olive Hill, Califor- 
nia. The first of the Cali- 
fornia dwellings and a 
characteristic California 
romanza, embodying the 
characteristic features of 
the region for a client who 
loved them and the thea- 
ter. She named the house 
Hollyhock House and asked 
that the flower be used as 
a motive in the decoration 
of the place. The wooden 
structure of the period and 
place plastered with con- 
crete and trimmed with 
cast stone. 







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2 1 . The Millard house, 
Miniatura" — Pasadena, 
California. The first con- 
crete block house to em- 
ploy the textile-block sys- 
tem invented by myself 
several years before. A 
hollow wall formed of 3- 
inch thick concrete blocks 
was reinforced in the joints 
both ways; steel cross ties 
placed every third course,- 
joints poured with thin ce- 
ment grout. An earthquake 
proof light construction but 
no permit could be issued 
because concrete got too 
big a preference. 




1922. Ennis House. Los Angeles, Co 




1927. San Marcos in the Desert was worked out upon a unit system 
adapted to the 1-2 or. 60-30 triangle because, as you may have 
noticed, mountain ranges are all 60-30 triangles unless your eye 
i s arre s ted by a n effect pr oduce d by one that is equilateral. A 
cross-section of the talus at the base of the mountains is the hypote- 
nuse of a 30-60 triangle. I used the surrounding giant growth, 
Sahuaro, as motive for the building. 





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Taliesin North (home of the Taliesin Fel- 
lowship) was first built in 1911. Twice 
destroyed by fire it has risen for the third 
time from its ashes and is today ap- 
proaching the completeness and quality 
originally hoped for by its architect. It 
is a house of the North and peculiar to 
the low rolling hills of the region — South- 
ern Wisconsin. The terraces command 
views of the valley below and the Wis- 
consin river beyond. Taliesin is a Welsh 
word meaning "shining brow." The place 
is built around the brow of the hill — not 
on the hill. 




Sroadacre City was fi 
lolly modelled in 1932 
Bs a Taliesin Fellowship 
project That original 
model is now included 
|n this exhibition. From 
^his over-all model 
these views have been 
taken. The model is 
based upon the theory 
of Decentralization — 
feeling that centraliza- 
tion of intense and 
growing urbanization 
has done its work and 
our modern techniques 
must have freedom to 
become truly advanta- 
geous. This freedom 
can be secured only by 
going forward to more 
intelligent use of man's 
heritage — the ground. 
Life in these Unitec 
States — by nature — is 
more agrarian than in- 
dustrial if our great gift 
of ground is to mean 
what it should mean tc 
the human being. 
iBroadocre City was a 
study in that direction — 
Ithe democratic ideal of 
freedom of the individ- 
ual here finds an archi- 
itecture more suited to 
tits future life than any 
urbanization can now 
offord. 




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1935 Fallmgwater, country-dwelling for the Edgar J. Koufmonns. The first house in my experience to be built of reinforced concrete 
So the form took the grammar of that type of construction. The Gale house at Oak Park built in wood and plaster was its progenitor as to 
general fype. 





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1938. The original Johnson Administration building. In the exhibition many views of this novel construction may be seen. Gloss tubing laid 
up like bricks in a wall compose all the lighting surfaces. Light enters the building where the cornice used to be. In the interior the boxlike 
structure vanished completely. Subsequently, the Heliolab and parking courts were added, completing the scheme in 1950. The walls 
carrying the gloss ribbing ore of hard red brick and red Kosota sandstone. The entire fabric is reinforced concrete, cold-drown mesh used 
for reinforcement. 



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1 934. Talieiin West was sfarted by the Taliesin 
Fellowship and has been an object les 
construction ever since to the apprentices who 
came to live and work there with the orchitect. 
The complete change in terrain caused a com- 
plete change in form. A new technique was 
necessary ond while it is difficult to imagine a 
greater variety of architectural contrast than 
seems to exist between Taliesin North and 
Taliesin West the some principles ore at work 
and there is basic sympathy between the two 
structures. 



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Taliesin West is a heavy masonry massed con- 
struction topped with redwood timbering car- 
rying frames upon which canvas has been 
stretched to make a textile overhead. The 
pleasantest lighting imaginable is the result. 
The inspiration for Taliesin West come from the 
same source as the early American primitives 
and there are certain resemblances, but not 
influences. 



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1934. The first Jacobs house— wood walls and ceilings 
Although used in the Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, 1914, and 
subsequently planned for the Nakoma Clubhouse, 
1927, and the Johnson Administration building, 1935, 
gravity-heat was first a finished product in this house. 
Therefore this was the first floor-heated house in the 
United States. 



1939. The Lloyd Lewis house, 
near Libertyville was designed 
for the low humid Chicago 
prairie. For that reason floors 
were kept up off the ground. The 
house is of cypress (walls and 
ceilings) inside and out. The 
masonry walls and piers are of 
pink Chicago common brick. As 
is usual with these houses, this 
one is furnished throughout as 
designed by the architect. 



1934. Goetsch-Winckler Cot- 
tage, Okemos, Michigan, was 
designed for two teachers at 
Michigan State College. It was 
originally part of a group of 
seven, the remaining six of 
which were never built because 
the F.H.A. decided they would 
not stand up. 





1950. The V. C. Morris shop, 
Maiden Lane, San Francisco. A 
gift shop dispensing well-de- 
signed things for the better class 
dwelling. Instead of the vulgar- 
izing display of merchandise on 
the sidewalk, here came an in- 
vitation to walk in, and a ramp 
connecting floor levels under a 
plastic bubble sky top became a 
good salesman. The shop has 
become an attraction for trav- 
elers. 




Planned 1936. Florida Southern College, a Methodist College, for Dr. Ludd M. Spivey. The project is still growing, probably the one 
entirely modern campus among our educational institutions. The over-all plan is Floridian in character consisting of deeply shaded winding 
esplanade, between buildings often eventuating into buildings. The whole is Florida-southern and plastic in feeling, richly planted. 



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1 949. The First Unitarian Meeting-house of Madison, Wiscon- 
sin—originally intended by this Unitarian Society to be built 
downtown. Decentralization in mind, they were persuaded to 
go out into adjoining country to build a characteristic social 
center. The edifice is based upon the triangle (the symbol of 
aspiration) in the form of prayer and symbolizes Unity above 
all. The singularly trussed roof is covered with copper. Walls 
ore of native limestone. 



1952. Dr. Peyton Canary's Christian Seminary, Phoenix, Ari- 
zona. This modest building scheme was designed to make use 
of an eighty acre tract of arable ground. A self-supporting 
cultural endeavor, it was planned to make use of the ground 
not only for religious education and residence but for actual 
agrarian cultivation as well. To be built of native stone walls, 
wood ceilings and copper roofing. 



1952. Pafio houie in the Sout 
Phoenix, Arizona — for son 
Wright. David himself supe 
the construction using co 
block mode by the Besser ' 
it is a good type of hous' 
region and affords many 
tages not possible to o house 
ground. It is a citrus orchor 
trict and the orange trees mo 
lawn for the house. The slow 
ing ramp reveals the surrou 
mountains and gives security 
occupants. The house is com 
in masonry with mahogany Cj 
and sash frames and doors. A 
roof garden reached by a minor 
romp surmounts the whole 
house is roofed with copper 
enameled sheet iron in appro 
pattern. 





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1953. House in Virginia near 
Washington for son Robert Llew- 
ellyn Wright. A simple oval and 
terrace on a steep hillside in a nar- 
row valley. House is to be built of 
narrow red concrete blocks like 
long bricks, building roofed with 
enameled metal. A simple version 
of the animate open-plan for a 
small family— the plan so made as 
to give varied views, at all points, 
of thf> beautiful site 




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1950. The Heliolab is here shown in relation to the Johnson ..tration Building built fifteen years before. 



NOTE 

This collection, far from complete, is extensive enough to convey to 
you some adequate knowledge of what our own country's contri- 
bution to the architecture of the modern world is. Since the space 
scale of modern domestic architecture was initiated by this work, 
the mock-up of a characteristic dwelling here approximates this scale 
as well as certain features of the open-plan that went along with the 
new scale. It is my hope that our architectural adolescents, especially, 
will derive from this exhibit what older generations seem to have 
missed — the real meaning of the term Organic Architecture. 
Semblances of this organic architecture have scattered far afield. 
But the reality of this architecture as originally proclaimed has not 
been there, as intelligent study of this collection of drawings and 
models indicates. Before the exhibition goes to the Orient — to 
Manila, Tokyo and New Delhi for the coming year, it is here in 
New York City asking to be discovered by you. 
As always heretofore, and I hope for some time hereafter, my work 
is for the "Young Man in Architecture." 

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT 
September, 1953 



CATALOGUE 



THREE INTRODUCTORY PANELS 

middle: The orchitect in his studio at Taliesin, near Spring Green, 
Wise. 

left: Taliesin North, the architect's home in Wisconsin, May to 

November. 

right; Taliesin West, his home in the Arizona desert near Phoenix, 
from November to May. 
o) Work Song, 1896, Oak Pork near Chicago, III. 



1. GUARANTY OFFICE BUILDING, BUFFALO, 1890. 

The most significant of the buildings by /leberme/s/er — Louis 
Sullivan. 

2. CHARNLEY HOUSE, CHICAGO, 1891. 

Executed when still working for Adier and Sullivan. Louis Sullivan 
was the artistic power in this eminent firm of Chicago architects, 
although Donkmar AdIer wos the master planner and engineer. 

3. HARLAN HOUSE, CHICAGO, 1892. 

4. GLASS & RUG DESIGNS, 1893-1910. 

POT-POURRI OF THE CHICAGO COLUMBIAN EXPOSITION, 

1893. 

Eclecticism, Imitation, Classicism "undigested." 

5. WINDMILL AT TALIESIN, SPRING GREEN, WISC, 1896. 
New type of engineering construction; the streamlined form of 
the structure is based on the penetration of a hexagon and a 
triangle. Called "Romeo and Juliet." 

6. HICKOX HOUSE, KANKAKEE, ILLINOIS, 1900. 
Forerunner of the "open plan." 

7. FACADE, 1901. 

8. THOMAS HOUSE, OAK PARK, ILLINOIS, 1901. 

9. ROSS HOUSE, DELAWARE LAKE, WISC, 1902. 

10. PROJECT FOR THE YAHARA BOAT CLUB, UNIVERSITY OF 
WISCONSIN, MADISON, WISC, 1902. 

Appeared in Europe in the Wasmuth publication of 1910. A 
fertile source of inspiration to the European architects of that 
period. 

11. WILLITTS HOUSE, HIGHLAND PARK, ILLINOIS, 1902. 
Typical prairie house. 

12. DANA HOUSE, LIBRARY, SPRINGFIELD, ILL., 1903. 

13. MARTIN HOUSE, BUFFALO, 1904. 

14. BALDWIN HOUSE, KENILWORTH, ILL., 1904-05. 

15. ADMINISTRATION BUILDING OF THE LARKIN COMPANY, 
BUFFALO, 1904-06. 

A protest against the abuse of ornamentation characteristic of 
the period, this building is contemporaneous with the Flatiron 
Building in New York. 



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16. UNITARIAN CHURCH, OAK PARK, ILLINOIS, 1906. 
View of the exterior, plan and drawing of the interior. 

17. UNITARIAN CHURCH, OAK PARK, ILLINOIS, 1906. 
One of the first buildings executed in reinforced concrete. 

18. COONLEY HOUSE, RIVERSIDE, NEAR CHICAGO, 1908. 

19. ROBERT W. EVANS HOUSE, CHICAGO, ILL., 1908. 

20. GILMORE HOUSE, MADISON, WISC, 1908. 
Called "The Airplane House." 

21. ROBERTS HOUSE, RIVi-R FOREST, NEAR CHICAGO, ILL., 1908. 

22. ROBIE HOUSE, CHICAGO, ILL., 1909. 
Prairie House. Early use of glass partitions. 

23. COONLEY KINDERGARTEN, RIVERSIDE, NEAR CHICAGO, 
1912. 

It contains a little stage, for which reason it is called the "Play- 
house." The building contains the Kinder-symphony in flash 
gloss — characteristic ornamentation. The motive: balloons and 
confetti. 

24. PRESS BUILDING, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL, 1912. 

This project profoundly influenced the development of the 
American skyscraper. 

25. FRANCIS W. LITTLE HOUSE, WAYZATA, MINN., 1913. 
Example of the integration of a house with nature; decentralized 
plan. This is the third house the architect built for Mr. Little. 

26. IMPERIAL HOTEL, TOKYO, 1913-19. 

This building is one of the few which resisted the disastrous 
earthquake of 1923. Synthesis of architectural and plastic forms, 
and of plants and water. 

27. Stone carving and polychrome decoration. Imperial Hotel, Tokyo, 
Japan, 1913. 

28. MIDWAY GARDENS, CHICAGO, ILL, 1913. 
Restaurant ond concert garden. Demolished in 1923. 

29. MIDWAY GARDENS, CHICAGO, ILL., 1913. 
Rear elevation. 

30. Decorative Panel, Midway Gardens, Chicago, III., 1913. 

31. Furniture Detail, Midway Gardens, Chicago, III., 1913. 



32. HOLLYHOCK HOUSE (FOR ALINE BARNSDALL), LOS ANGELES, 
CAL., 1920. 

33. ORIGINAL PLANS FOR THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE DOHENY 
RANCH, SIERRA MADRE, CALIFORNIA, 1921. 

34. TYPICAL VACATION HOUSE, LAKE TAHOE SUMMER 
COLONY, CAL., 1922. 

35. ENNIS HOUSE, LOS ANGELES, CAL., 1922. 

36. STORER HOUSE, LOS ANGELES, CAL., 1923. 

37. MILLARD HOUSE, PASADENA, CAL., 1923. 
"La Miniature." 

38. PROJECT FOR AN OFFICE BUILDING FOR THE NATIONAL 
LIFE INSURANCE CO., CHICAGO, ILL., 1924. 

39. PLANETARIUM AND OBSERVATION TOWER FOR GORDON 
STRONG, NEAR WASHINGTON (PROJECT), 1924. 

40. TALIESIN NORTH III, SPRING GREEN, WISC, 1925. 

41. SAN MARCOS IN THE DESERT, CHANDLER, ARIZONA, 1927. 

42. SAN MARCOS WATER GARDENS, CHANDLER, ARIZONA, 
1927. 

43. PROJECT FOR THE YOUNG HOUSE, CHANDLER, ARIZONA, 
1927. 

44. PROJECT FOR APARTMENTS FOR ELIZABETH NOBLE, LOS 
ANGELES, CAL, 1929. 

45. KINDERGARTEN FOR THE ROSENWALD FOUNDATION, 1929. 

46. MEMORIAL CHAPEL, PROJECT, 1930. 

47. ST. MARK'S TOWER, NEW YORK CITY, 1929. 

Model, two-story apartments,- built of copper, glass and con- 
crete,- constructed with a central core and cantilevered floot 
slobs. 

48. PLANS FOR ST. MARK'S TOWER, NEW YORK CITY, 1929. 

49. PROJECT FOR NEWSPAPER PLANT AT SALEM, ORE., 1931. 
Forerunner of the Johnson Administration Building. 

50. PHOTOGRAPH OF THE MODEL OF BROADACRE CITY, 1932. 

51. BROADACRE CITY. 

Model. A conception of the ideal modern decentralized com- 
munity. Scale of the model: 4 square miles. This area includes 
2200 one-acre plots. Protesting against the exaggerated and in- 



humon concenfrofion in American cities, Broadacre City is de- 
signed for the direct contoct of mon with nature and the 
countryside. His birthright is re-established, the wide, open 
spaces are appropriately built upon. Thus the "urbanized coun- 
tryside" is born as a new type of city — one adopted to indi- 
vidual living. 

Panels illustrating the principles of organic architecture ore set 
up alongside the model. Entire plan of Broadacre City indicating 
the most important buildings may be seen in "When Democracy 
Builds" (Chicogo University Press). Ideas for the "new freedom" 
of living ore embodied in collateral models not included in this 
exhibit. 

legend: 

1. Government building. 

2. Administration. 

3. Stable and ouf-buildings. 

4. Polo grounds and other sports fields. 

5. Baseball. 

6. Sport club. 

7. Lake and small river. 

8. little farms, the fireproof all-purpose farmhouse. 

9. Monument to the Machine Age. 

10. Park. 

1 1. Music garden. 

12. Both and Gymnosium. 

13. Shopping center. 

14. Drive-in. 

15. Business center. 

16. Small studios for crafts, dwellings above. 

17. Markets. 

18. Airline offices. 

19. Moin roilrood, high speed at center, having replaced the 
present-day railroad with truck lines at each side level with 
parallel highways. 

20. Airplane hangars alongside the railroads. 

21. Vineyards and flower beds for nurserymen. 

22. Private clinics for doctors. 



23. Three types of smoll houses for small forms. 

24. Schools — kindergarten to high school. 

25. Religious center (Columbarium, courtyard of urns. Temple of 
the nine sects surrounding a cultural center which is shown 
in the model in the process of being built.) 

26. Residence or resort hotels. 

27. Agricultural experiment station. 

28. Forestry experiment station. 

29. Zoologicol garden. 

30. Aquarium. 

31. Circus. 

31a. Monument symbolizing prehistoric civilization. 

32. Hotel. 

33. Club. 

34. Hospital. 

35. Workers' center. 

36. Polyclinic. 

37. Smoll dwelling. 

38. Small neighborhood stores. 

39. Homes for the aged. 

40. Unfurnished apartments for city dwellers. 

41. Private houses of more extent. 

42. Reservoir. 

43. Taliesin (or on equivalent art center). 

44. Architects and artists employed in the public services of the 
city — a civic center. 

45. Small movie theater. 

46. Forest shelter. 

47. Larger houses — for individuals. 

48. Solution of four-way traffic and rood systems. 

49. Garage with individual cubicles for helicopters. 

50. Crop storage. 

52. FARM UNIT, BROADACRE CITY, 1932. 
Prefabricated steel construction model. 



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53. PROJECT FOR THE WILLEY HOUSE, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN., 
1932. 

Model for a '"Usonion" house. 

54. WILLEY HOUSE, MINNEAPOLIS, MINN., 1934. 

55. FAILING WATER (E. J. KAUFMANN HOUSE), BEAR RUN, PA., 
1936. 

56. HANNA HOUSE, PALO ALTO, CAL., 1937. 

57. JACOBS HOUSE, MADISON, WISC, 1937. 
Cost in 1937: $5,500. 

58. JOHNSON ADMINISTRATION BUILDING, RACINE, WISC, 
1937. 

^9 ■WINGSPREAD," JOHNSON HOUSE, RACINE, WISC, 1937. 
Model. 

60. PLAN FOR A GROUP OF SEVEN USONIAN HOUSES, 
OKEMOS, MICH., 1938. 

Model. 

61. TALIESIN WEST, NEAR PHOENIX, ARIZ., 1938. 

62. TALIESIN WEST, NEAR PHOENIX, ARIZ., 1938. 
Guest cottage. 

63. COLOR TRANSPARENCIES, TALIESIN WEST, PHOENIX, ARIZ., 
1938. 

64. TALIESIN STUDIO, 1938. 

65. FALLING WATER, GUEST WING, BEAR RUN, PA., ADDITION- 
1939. 

66. LLOYD LEWIS HOUSE, LIBERTYVILLE, ILL., 1939. 
Original drawing. 

67. MODEL OF THE LLOYD LEWIS HOUSE, LIBERTYVILLE, ILL., 1939. 

68. LLOYD LEWIS HOUSE, LIBERTYVILLE, ILL., 1939. 

69. MONONA TERRACE CIVIC CENTER, 1939. 

70. PEW HOUSE, MADISON, WISC, 1939. 
Built on contract by the Taiiesin Fellowship. 

71. ROSENBAUM HOUSE, FLORENCE, ALA., 1939. 

72. SPIVEY HOUSE, FORT LAUDERDALE, FLA., 1939. 

73. STURGES HOUSE, BRENTWOOD HEIGHTS, LOS ANGELES, 
CAL., 1939. 

74. "SUNTOP" HOUSE, ARDMORE, PA., 1939. 
Quadruple housing. 



75. "SUNTOP" HOUSE, 1939. 
Model, 

76. WINKLER-GOETSCH HOUSE, OKEMOS, MICH., 1939. 
Typical "Usonion" house. 

77. BAZETT HOUSE, HILLSBOROUGH, CAL., 1940. 

78. "EAGLE FEATHER" (OBOLER HOUSE), LOS ANGELES, CAL., 
1940. 

79. FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE, LAKELAND, FLA., 1940. 
Ann Pfeiffer chapel. 

80. FLORIDA SOUTHERN COLLEGE, LAKELAND, FLA., 1940. 

81. JESTER HOUSE PROJECT, PALOS VERDES, CAL., 1940. 
Model. 

82. PAUSON HOUSE, PHOENIX, ARIZ., 1940. 
Situated in the desert on a hill outside of Phoenix. 

83. AFFLECK HOUSE, BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MICH., 1941. 
Model. 

84. SUNDT HOUSE, MADISON, WISC, 1941. 
Model. 

85. WALL HOUSE, PLYMOUTH, MICH., 1941. 

86. SECOND JACOBS HOUSE, MIDDLETON, WISC, 1942. 
Berm type. 

87. LOEB HOUSE, REDDING, CONN., 1942. 

88. A MODERN GALLERY FOR THE GUGGENHEIM FOUNDA- 
TION, NEW YORK CITY, 1943. 

89. PROJECT I, CIVIC PLAYGROUND FOR THE "GOLDEN 
TRIANGLE," PITTSBURGH, PA., 1947. 

90. PROJECT II, CIVIC PLAYGROUND FOR THE "GOLDEN 
TRIANGLE," PITTSBURGH, PA., 1947. 

91. CLUBHOUSE FOR HUNTINGTON HARTFORD, HOLLYWOOD 
HILLS, CAL., 1947. 

92. JOHNSON LABORATORY TOWER, RACINE, WISC, 1947. 

93. KEITH HOUSE, ARLINGTON, N. J., 1947. 
Original drawings. 

94. PLAN FOR ROGER LACY HOTEL, DALLAS, TEX., 1947. 

95. UNITARIAN MEETING HOUSE, MADISON, WISC, 1947. 



96. McCORD HOUSE, ARLINGTON, N. J., 1948. 
Original drawings. 

97. ORIGINAL DRAWING FOR A GUEST LODGE AT METEOR 
CRATER, ARIZ., 1948 

98. SHOP FOR V. C. MORRIS, SAN FRANCISCO, CAl., 1948. 

99. PARKWYN VILLAGE, KALAMAZOO, MICH., 1948. 
Originol drawings. Plot plan and examples of several houses 
for cooperative village. 

100. MELVYN MAXWELL SMITH HOUSE, BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MICH., 
1948. 

101. ORIGINAL DRAWING FOR A BANK AT SUNNYSLOPE, 
ARIZONA, 1948. 

102. ADELMANN HOUSE, MILWAUKEE, WlSC, 1949. 

103. BUHLER HOUSE, OAKLAND, CAL., 1949. 
Typical set of working drawings. 

104. FRIEDMAN HOUSE, PLEASANTVILLE, N. Y., 1949. 

105. ORIGINAL DRAWINGS FOR THE NEW THEATER AT HART- 
FORD, CONN., 1949. 

106. THE NEW THEATER FOR HARTFORD, CONN., 1949. Model. 

107. PROJECT FOR PARKING GARAGE FOR E. J. KAUFMANN, 
PITTSBURGH, 1949. 

108. SAN FRANCISCO BAY BRIDGE, CAL., 1949. 

109. WALTER HOUSE, QUASQUETON, IOWA, 1949. 

ilO. E J. KAUFFMAN HOUSE, PALM SPRINGS, CAL., 1950. 

111. SABIN HOUSE - MEMPHIS, TENN., 1950. Original drawing. 

112 MODEL FOR A USONIAN HOUSE. 

The roof is portly removed to show the organic relation of the 
parts to each other — typical of a Usonian house. 

113. THOMAS KEYES HOUSE, ROCHESTER, MINN., 1951. 
Berm Type. 

114 V C. MORRIS HOUSE. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL., 1951. 
Revised Drawing. 

115 AFFLECK HOUSE, BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MICH., 1952. 

' RAOUL BAILLERES HOUSE, ACAPULCO, MEX , 1952. 



117. CHRISTIAN SEMINARY, PHOENIX, ARIZ., 1952. 

118. PRIVATE CHAPEL, E. J. KAUFFMAN FAMILY, BEAR RUN, PA., 
1952. 

119. DAVID WRIGHT HOUSE, PHOENIX, ARIZ., 1952. 

120. COLOR TRANSPARENCIES, DAVID WRIGHT HOUSE, 
PHOENIX, ARIZ., 1952. 

121. DESERT COTTAGE, JORGINE BOOMER, PHOENIX, ARIZ., 
1953. 

122. MASSIERI MEMORIAL, GRAND CANAL, VENICE, ITALY, 1953. 
An architectural library and dormitory for twelve students. Dork- 
veined white marble. 

123. POINT VIEW APARTMENTS, FOR E. J. KAUFMANN, PITTS- 
BURGH, PA., 1953. 

124. H. C. PRICE TOWER, BARTLESVILLE, OKLA., 1953. 

125. ROBERT LLEWELLYN WRIGHT HOUSE, VIRGINIA, NEAR 
WASHINGTON, D. C, 1953. 

ORIGINAL DRAWINGS 

126. A) Focode of building for the Luxfer Prism Co., Chicago, 1895. 

B) Sketch for Goon House, La Grange, III., 1894. 

C) Cooper House, La Grange, III., 1889. 

127. A) Preliminary sketches for the Wolf Lake Resort, III., 1895. 

B) Sketch, plan, and perspective for the Winslow House, River 
Forest, III., 1893. 

128. A) Sketch for a house published by the "Ladies' Home Journal" 

in February, 1901. 

B) View of the "City House," American System, 1901. 

C) View and plan of the house at River Forest, III., 1902. 

D) Plan of facade for Lexington Terrace Apartments, Chicago, 
1901. 

129. A) Drawing in perspective for the Wallis House, Delowore Lake, 

Wise, 1901. 

B) Sketch for the Beochy House, Oak Pork, 1900 (built in 1906). 

C) Sketch for the metal ornaments for the Dona House, Spring- 
field, III., 1903. 

D) Plan for the Yahora Boat Club, University of Wisconsin, 
Madison, Wise, 1903. 



130. A) Plan for a group of four houses with gardens for C. E. 

Roberts, Chicago. 

Fair Oaks, Oak Park, 1904. 

B) Sketch for a House for Elizabeth Stone, Glencoe, III., 1903-05. 

C) Sketch with plan and elevation for the McCormick House, 
Lake Forest, 1902-03. 

131. Plans for the Larkin Company, Buffalo, 1904. 

A) Sketch. 

B) Grammar of the protestant. 

C) Sketch for the office tables with interchangeable component 
parts. 

D) Sketch for a steel chair. 

132. Plans for Unity Temple, Oak Park, III., 1905. 

A) Perspective. 

B) Sketch in perspective. 

C) Detail of a mullion. 

D) Study of lighting fixture. 

133. A) Plan for a concrete house. 

Price: $5000; published in the Ladies' Home Journal, 1907. 

B) Plan for the Gale House, Ook Perk, III., 1904 (built in 1909). 

C) General plan for the UHmann House, Oak Pork, III., 1906. 

134. A) Two sketches for architect's own home and studio at Fiesole, 

Viale Verdi, 1910. 
B) Abstract decorative study. 

135. A) First plan for the Adams House, Oak Park, III. (built in 1913). 

B) "Kinder-symphony," sketch for the stained-glass windows 
in the Coonley Kindergarten, 191 1 . 

C) Other plans for stained-glass windows, 1909. 

D) Two drawings of grillwork for the Robie House, Chicogo, 
III., 1910. 

136. A) Plan for the Banff National Park recreation building, Alta, 

Canada, 1913. 

B) Plan for the Bach House, Chicago, III., 1912-13. 

C) Sketch for the Avery Coonley Kindergarten, Riverside, III., 
1911. 

137. Plans for Midway Gardens, Chicago, III., 1913 (destroyed in 
19231. 



A) Plan. 

B) Two plans for the lamps on the terrace. 

C) Two designs for lighting fixtures. 

138. A) San Marcos in the desert. 

B) San Marcos in the desert. 

C) Two schemes for children's playhouses: the "Anne Baxter," 
and the "lovanno." For the Oak Park Playground Associa- 
tion, III., 1926. 

139. A) Sketch of St. Mark's Tower, New York, N. Y., 1928. 

B) Plan and elevation of the Millard House, Pasadena, Col., 
1920-21. 

C) Sketch of Storer House, Los Angeles, 1923. 

140. House on the Mesa, 1931. 

141. "A Century of Progress." 

Project for the Chicago World's Fair in 1933. Perspective draw- 
ings of the main and side elevations of skyscraper. Plan. 

142. "Falling Water," plan for the Koufmann House, Bear Run, Pa., 
1936. 

143. A) Plan: Second story of "Falling Water." 
B) Elevation. 

144. Johnson Wax Co. Administration Building, Racine, Wise, 1936-37. 

A) Sketch of tower. 

B) Plan and sketch of the entire project. 

C) Cross section of tower. 

145. Sketch of Hotel and Theater, Crystal Heights, Washington, D. C, 
1940. 

146. A) Jacobs House, Middleton, Wise, 1940. 
B) Sketch for the "Solar Hemicycle" house. 

147. Plan for quadruple housing for the U. S. Government, Pittsfield, 
Mass., 1942. 

148. "Moon-sun," preliminary study for Elizabeth Arden, 1945. 

149. A) Plan for the Administration Building of the Calico Mills, 
Ahmedabad, India, 1946. 

B) Sketch for Huntington Hartford, Hollywood Hills, Cal,, 1947. 

150. Drawings of the V. C. Morris House, San Francisco, 1947. 

151. Sketches for Maginel Barney, Windmill Hill, Wise, 1949. 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

These companies and their products are too well known to need any comment from the architect. 
It is rather to say that their friendship and liberality in this instance are a recommendation for him. 

FRANK LLOYD WRIGHT 



BROADWAY MAINTENANCE CORPORATION 

CEIOTEX CORPORATION 

CHAMBERS CORPORATION 

CHESEBRO-WHITMAN COMPANY, INC. 

CORNING GLASS WORKS 

CRANE COMPANY 

DODGE CORK COMPANY 

ELKAY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

GENERAL ELECTRIC COMPANY 

GENERAL LIGHTING COMPANY 

HERITAGE-HENREDON FURNITURE COMPANY 

JAMES LEES & SONS COMPANY 

IIBBEY- OWENS-FORD GLASS COMPANY 

MISSISSIPPI GLASS COMPANY 

MOSS ROSE MANUFACTURING COMPANY 



MATERIALS SUPPLY COMPANY 

COMPANY 
COMPANY 
INC. 
CORPORATION 



NU-BRICKCRETE BUILDING 

PANTHER MANUFACTURING 

PITTSBURGH PLATE GLASS 

TRADE-WIND MOTORFANS, 

UNITED STATES PLYWOOD 

UNITED STATES RUBBER COMPANY 

WASCO FLASHING COMPANY 

Construction of the house and pavilion was in the hands of 

DAVID HENKEN, HENKEN BUILDS, INC., P L E A S A N T V I L L E , NEW YORK 



Ik 



I 




1953. The skyscraper, unintentionally, has 
hastened decentralization. So, to the roli- 
ng plains of Oklahoma comes a fresh reali- 
zation of the advantages of architecture as 
yet unknown to the greet city. As trees 
crowded in the forest have no chance to be- 
come themselves (as they could if they stood 
alone) so the skyscraper needs to be free- 
standing to become a human asset. The 
"upended street" in nature gains more na- 
tural advantages from natural use of the 
technical triumphs of steel and glass. Individ- 
uality is no less appropriate to American 
business, even more appropriate than to 
other facets of American life. The successful 
H. C. Price Company intends to enjoy all there 
is to be had through complete use of pre- 
ferred, convenient, compact space in open 
sky— fresh air, far views, the workers for 
Price to be surrounded by roof gardens, 
fountains. And here in splendid isolation 
they will defy climatic discomfort, winning 
dominance ot no man's expense but their 
own. This type of sheltered-gloss tower 
building I first designed in 1 924 for Chicago 
and in 1929 for St. Mark's-in-the-Bouwerie 
in New York. The idea has already been 
imitated, more or less, all over the world. 
Has our country in the interval grown up to 
skyscraper status, or has the skyscraper 
token a field trip of its own? No matter; I 
believe this type of structure, weighing but a 
fraction of Rockefeller Center structures, will 
become a natural everywhere for successful 
men and companies like the one this build- 
ing tells us about. Freedom of interior and 
exterior occupation, protection of available 
light and air, ore here. Copper blades and 
tinted glass together moke air conditioning 
ess a necessity, make the occupant more 
comfortable and his "pump" more likely to 
hold out, when extremes of warm and cool 
alternate to tear his human structure down. 
Witness this release of the skyscraper from 
slavery (of commercial bondage) to a human 
freedom. Contract for the Price Tower was 
finally let for about one and one-quarter 
million dollars— or about $20 per sq. foot. 



Th« Trustees of The Solomon R. 
Guggenheim Foundotion ore 
proud to present to the New York 
public the first comprehensive ex- 
hibition of Mr, Frank Uoyd Wrighfs 
work. "Sixty Years of living Archi- 
tecture." This record of the con- 
crete reoli?otion of the ideals of 
such a great architect is not only 
on invaluable documentation of 
post achievement, but on inspira- 
tion for the future. It is a privilege 
fo be able to offer it through The 
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. 

HAMY F GUGGENHEIM 
Choirmon of the Boord 

Tradition is the bone and sinews of 

ort; but freedom is the air it must 

breathe The courage to expose 

ones efforts to this air is a neces- 
sary requirement for the creative 

artist. The rood to the future is not Orfe''^!?!^ 

the rood of any one style. Nor is ..^ '• 

rhe artist committed to the post in 

any way beyond what he shou' 

leorn from it for his personal e^ 

pression. Mr. Frank Lloyd Wright 

hfework as on architect has been a 
persistent exemplificotion of these j 
simple but exacting facts. His 
achievement as o creative indi- 
vidualist is their justification. The f- 
-^ew Museum Buildings which ore 
•o be erected on the site of the 
present temporary exhibition 
should stand as their enduring 
symbol j^^^j jOHNSON SWEENEY _ 

Director of the Museum =^-_